R90/6

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gardenergild
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R90/6

Postby gardenergild » Mon Aug 28, 2017 3:55 pm

Hi, I have a 97 R1100 RS but would like a classic bike that doesn`t take too much tinkering with, as my skills are limited ! I very much like the look of an R90/6 1977 that is on Ebay I have no idea what they are worth and whether it would fit the bill. Is there a lot of difference between riding one of these and our current bike ?
1997 R1100RS

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Jaythro
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Re: R90/6

Postby Jaythro » Mon Aug 28, 2017 5:30 pm

Yes
Electrics are horrible on them as they all gather in the headlamp and the looms get corroded at joints etc

90/6 are often cloned into 90S which will drive the price up on 2 fronts ONe for someone seeking a 90/6 because they are rare or someone wanting a 90S clone

All the airhead prices have gone up radically with the "bobber" "scrambler" craze
"Put your Ass on a motorcycle and ride with an attitude and the "Grim Reaper" will ride in your shadow!"

Islandmagee in case you're interested?

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Galactic Greyhound
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Re: R90/6

Postby Galactic Greyhound » Mon Aug 28, 2017 5:52 pm

There is probably less maintenance work required with your 1997 R1100RS Oilhead than a 1977 R90/6 Airhead!

In terms of riding, the Oilhead will be more comfortable, more reliable and capable of doing higher daily mileages than the Airhead.

The Airhead will be simpler to maintain in that it does not have any electronics for Ignition, Fuelling or ABS so if anything goes wrong it is likely to be mechanical or basic electrics skills required to fix it.

That can also be a disadvantage because the Oilhead electronic Ignition and Fuelling (Fuel Injection) systems tend to be more reliable than their electro-mechanical counterparts of earlier years.
You won't have to fiddle with Carburettors, blocked jets, leaky float chambers, torn diaphragms or a corroded fuel tank (the Oilhead tank is plastic).
If the electronics does go wrong, it can take more skill to diagnose the problem which normally results in replacing an electronic module/part completely because of the difficulty/skill/knowledge required to fix the faulty component.

However, you have an 1997 R1100RS Oilhead which in itself is a 'Classic' being one of the first Oilheads and a very good touring/commuting bike.
It has the advantage over the later Oilheads (R1150) of having a very robust and reliable ABS system (ABS2) which is a worthwhile safety feature the Airheads don't have.
The ABS2 system merely sits on top of a standard hydraulic braking system allowing you to bleed the brakes as you would an Airhead and it does not have the later servo-brake function (iABS-1) which means that, if it ever fails, your brakes still work as normal except that you don't have the ABS function.

The engine maintenance is the same as for an Airhead; tappets, plugs and oil changes. If anything, the Oilhead Oil Filter is easier to change and less risky than that on the Airhead where incorrect assembly of the Oil Filter components can result in a seized engine.

The Oilhead uses tubeless tyres making on-the-road puncture repair a 10-minute job to fix with a sticky-string repair kit and 12v Air Pump against the Airhead tubed tyres which will usually require the removal of the wheel, tyre and tube to apply a patch or fit a new tube if that is torn.
There are some 'foam' tubed-tyre repair kits available which may effect a temporary repair but I never found them very reliable and always carried spare tubes when touring.

The Oilhead Telelever and Paralever suspension is much better than that on the Airhead especially on poor road surfaces. The front Telelever uses a spring strut and arm suspension system like on a car which is simpler to maintain than the Airhead forks.

The Oilhead Charging system is much better and more reliable than that on an Airhead as it is all contained in a car-type Alternator system.

If you do not have a Haynes or a Clymer service manual for your R1100RS then this is definitely worthwhile purchasing if you intend to keep costs down by DIY maintenance.
The Haynes manual has a section on basic engineering tools and practices which is useful if you don't have much DIY experience.
The manual will guide you through all the routine maintenance procedures with diagrams and photos.
The Forum here will assist you with anything you are unsure about! :smile:
Ced.

R1100RT 1996.
Sent by Boson Quantum Transmission from the Starship 'Galahad'.
http://www.researchgate.net/publication ... ing_bosons" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; - It works!

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bwprice100
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Re: R90/6

Postby bwprice100 » Mon Aug 28, 2017 9:09 pm

Once an airhead is brought up to proper standard maintence is minimal and easy.

Brian

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1958 R26, (not so many bits now)
1978 R75/7, (a project bike)
1981 R80, (was a TIC)
1995 R1100RT, (speeding ticket the first day I rode it) (Sold)
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Tony the Skin
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Re: R90/6

Postby Tony the Skin » Mon Aug 28, 2017 11:10 pm

The 90/6 is a very fine machine. Go for it. Very easy to live with and far better quality of finish than post 1980 bikes.
BMW R75/5
BMW R90/S
BMW R75/7
BMW K75 Sprint
BMW R1200 RS LC
Harleys
MZ 251
Suzuki GT750A

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gardenergild
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Re: R90/6

Postby gardenergild » Tue Aug 29, 2017 4:10 pm

I was going to keep the RS and add an earlier R model as we love the classic looks. A smaller bike would be great for just Sunday rides, and a classic would let us go to a few shows. We just liked the look of the R90 but a smaller cc would probably do ! The RS is a great bike but its not small ! Great for longer trips though.
1997 R1100RS

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george baker
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Re: R90/6

Postby george baker » Sun Sep 03, 2017 9:20 pm

Hi
if you want classic looks but modern bike why not try a R100R?

George
Member 21, R100R, K75 and a Hyosung 250 FOR SALE

chasbmw
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Re: R90/6

Postby chasbmw » Wed Sep 06, 2017 4:18 pm

My R90/6 took me to Corsica this year......
Charles
2016 CCM 450
1975 R90/6
1958 R50
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CharlieVictor
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Re: R90/6

Postby CharlieVictor » Fri Nov 03, 2017 12:28 pm

I was going to keep the RS and add an earlier R model as we love the classic looks. A smaller bike would be great for just Sunday rides, and a classic would let us go to a few shows. We just liked the look of the R90 but a smaller cc would probably do ! The RS is a great bike but its not small ! Great for longer trips though.
I think you need to make up your own mind. Go check one or two and see if you like it.
1978 BMW R100S "Naked"
1999 W650 "Twin with a kick"


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